Items 1 to 10 of 124 total

per page
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
nine-to-five-250x189

Over the years, numerous "Evergreen" readers have written to us recalling their first jobs and amusing experiences in the world of work. The satisfaction of receiving your first wage packet marks one of those key moments in life when you feel as if you are finally making your own way and "earning a living". How did your working life begin? For many people a Saturday job was their introduction to employment. It was a rite of passage that gave you extra pocket money and independence while still at school and helped boost your confidence and experience. A recent survey has revealed, though, that Saturday jobs undertaken by teenagers aged 13 to 15 are in marked decline and have fallen by a fifth in the last five years.

Read More
comedy-greats-250x189

Humour and happiness feature prominently in the current issue of Evergreen, which is now on sale (click here to order a copy). We have a typically tattyfilarious tribute and interview with the squire - or perhaps that should be the Knight – of Knotty Ash, Sir Ken Dodd. Regular readers will recall that in 2016, This England campaigned for Ken, who has just celebrated his 90th birthday and is still playing to packed houses around the country, to receive his knighthood and we were thrilled when he was awarded the honour earlier this year. In the article you can discover more about his childhood, his comic influences and his career which, I’m delighted to say, shows no sign of slowing down.

Read More
glorious-years-250x189

In their life together they have celebrated their silver, golden, ruby and diamond wedding anniversaries, and on Monday 20th November, Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness Prince Philip will reach their platinum anniversary – marking an astonishing 70 years together. In the winter issue of Evergreen, which is now on sale (click here), we have a fascinating feature looking back at the build-up to the royal couple's magical wedding day in 1947, which lifted the spirits of the nation and the Commonwealth in the years after the war.

Read More
remembrance-and-healing-250x189

This weekend the nation will pause to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice in conflicts throughout the decades. Churches and cathedrals, together with memorials in villages, towns and cities across Britain will become the focal point for remembrance. These war memorials stand as sacred sentinels; an eternal reminder of the valour and selfless dedication to duty of those who served on the front line. Their names are inscribed in stone for eternity and, in the words of Laurence Binyon’s poignant poem "For the Fallen": “We will remember them.”

Read More
electric-car-250x189

Transport heritage, whether by road, rail, sea or air, is always a popular subject that gets readers’ – and authors’ - memories going and prompts some wonderful recollections. Our current autumn issue includes the “Motoring Adventures” article, which takes us on a terrific journey across Europe as a writer recalls his family holidays by car from the 1960s and 1970s. Evergreen's winter issue, which is published on 22nd November (click here for subscriptions), features an article highlighting an entirely different method of transport that was once a familiar sight on the streets of certain towns and cities across the UK; the trolleybus. Remember them? They looked just like a conventional bus, but were attached to a network of overhead cables and wires.

Read More
robin-letter-250x189

Have you noticed that letters and correspondence have been in the news just lately? Earlier in the month, one of the last letters to have been written on the Titanic, the day before the ship sank, was sold for a record-breaking price. Written by an American businessman, Oscar Holverson, to his mother, on Titanic headed notepaper, it fetched an incredible £126,000. Sadly, the writer perished in the disaster, but his wife survived and the unposted letter, stained by the waters of the Atlantic, was subsequently found in her husband's pocket book.

Read More
sixties-style-250x189

Last weekend saw the finale of this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival, which has brought bibliophiles and culture vultures from across the country to Evergreen and This England’s hometown. It was a marvellous 10 days of events featuring authors, historians, politicians, actors, comedians, musicians, journalists, poets, photographers and many more. On Saturday afternoon I joined a packed audience to see an interview with a lady whose face symbolised a decade and became part of Britain's cultural history. She was – and indeed still is - a style icon and, like many who made the headlines at the time, she captured the youthful spirit, creativity and British quirky charm, which characterised that era. She is Neasden’s most famous daughter. Any ideas?

Read More
puff-of-smoke-250x189

There are certain things that, due to technological progress or changing tastes, we no longer tend to see in everyday life. But every now and then you come across a refreshing glimpse of yesteryear amid the 21st-century. This happened to me a couple of weeks ago during my lunch-hour as I walked into Cheltenham town centre. Outside a shop, I saw a tall gentleman, smartly dressed in a tweed suit. He had a contented and reflective look on his face as he engaged in a seldom-seen pursuit and I instantly thought: “Now, there’s a sight you don’t see very often these days.” At once the memories started to flood back. I have seen him on several occasions since, doing exactly the same thing and, as I walk past him, I know that he is enjoying a moment’s peace within the frantically paced world. You see, dear reader, the tweed-suited gentleman of whom I write, is one of a particularly rare breed in these times; he is a pipe smoker.

Read More
antique-shop-250x189

Back in 1979 I recall my parents tuning in to a new programme one Sunday afternoon on BBC1. By the time the credits rolled they were hooked and the subsequent series became a "must-see" in our house. All these years later my parents are still watching and I too have become a keen viewer. The fact that the "Antiques Roadshow" has just embarked on its 40th series is testament to its enduring appeal and success. Like many objects featured on the programme, it has become a much-loved treasure and I think that is largely because it is so wonderfully and reassuringly British. Where else in the world would people queue patiently, in all weathers, to have their collectables and curiosities valued?

Read More
wish-you-were-here-250x189

Just like sand in sandwiches, sticks of rock and wrestling with a windbreak on a windswept beach, sending a postcard has been an intrinsic part of the British holiday tradition since the 1900s. It coined the expressions "Wish you were here" and "Having a lovely time", and generations of holidaymakers have penned and posted a few lines to the folks back home from much-loved resorts and destinations across the country. From souvenir shops and beach-side kiosks we would purchase scenes of coast, countryside, towns, villages, famous landmarks and customs, or even throngs of happy holidaymakers - like ourselves - paddling in the briny, basking in the sun or savouring the bracing sea air. And, among the picturesque panoramas and subtle watercolours who can forget those cheeky colourful cartoon postcards famed for their own saucy blend of humour!

Read More

Items 1 to 10 of 124 total

per page
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5